Have you checked your cupboards?

Our focus for January is caged hens eggs. With 48% of eggs produced in the UK coming from caged hens, we question who is still buying them? The sad truth is that most of us are. Until I started researching into this that included me! I never thought about croissants, ice cream, deserts, sauces, pasta, sponge cake, or even when I picked up an egg mayonnaise sandwich (thinking it was a good non-meat choice).

Read the label and there it is shock horror – egg (15%), egg white (3%) etc. – this is caged hen eggs used as ingredients. When we eat out, how many of us ask the waitress if the soufflé or the bearnaise sauce is made using free range egg?

Read labels, ask in the cafe, check the ingredients list when you do online shopping. You will quickly get used to what brands and products contain free range rather than caged eggs. Remember if it doesn’t state free range it is most likely a caged hen egg. By law boxed (shell) eggs have to be labelled as caged hen eggs but this does not apply to eggs used as ingredients.

I’ve done a mini comparison of everyday goods from our leading supermarkets and a brand equivalent to help demonstrate some issues:

The clear message is that this is not a cost issue, the use of free range egg relates to our perception and expectation. The producers copy each other, Hellman’s mayonnaise moved to using free range eggs and made it very public, so lots of producers of mayonnaise did the same. Mayonnaise is a low value product but because the public expectation is for free range eggs they use free range eggs.

Fresh pasta is another story. Weight for weight fresh pasta is more than double the price of dried pasta, some even have it made in Italy so they can label it ‘authentic’, BUT then still use caged hens eggs because that is the industry standard and we don’t seem to notice.

Mary Berry shame on you! I thought you were such a lovely lady and made such lovely cakes. The cake reviews are terrible which isn’t a surprise, any real baker knows that a great cake start with good quality eggs. I always smile when I crack my chickens eggs into the flour and marvel at the naturally strong yellow colour they add.

Thanks for reading

The ethivore girls (my hens!)

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